Cooking For Sig

A Sous Chef and Her Stories


Leave a comment

My Friend’s Urban Farm Salad

imageIsn’t that a pretty plate of leftover veggie sides? On Sunday night, Matt and I finally hosted a game night. After months of procrastination and laziness, we invited a dozen friends over for dinner and games and we’ve been eating the remnants of the ridiculously large meal ever since. I would love to give you the recipe for the beautiful green salad at the bottom of the plate. It was the clear star, but sadly the recipe resides solely in my friend’s head. And even if she committed the recipe to paper, it wouldn’t do you any good because step one takes place two months earlier and requires that you turn your concrete parking pad into an urban farm complete with hand pollinated corn. Continue reading

Advertisements


Leave a comment

Summer in Maine and Artichoke Salad

imageWe had a wonderful time in Maine last month. The weather was hit or miss with some days of sun and some days of rain, but the dreary days were far nicer than anticipated. A good excuse to bake cookies, read books, and drive forty-five minutes to the closest movie theater. (Or at least the closest theater that shows movies released in the current decade.) Rangeley is a tiny Maine town. There’s one grocery store, one bookstore, an old stone library, one K – 12 school with a dozen students per grade, a handful of restaurants, sporting good shops, and antique stores. And of course a historical society with a dresser full of local bird eggs and a logging museum full of chainsaws and old photos of bearded men wearing plaid. There’s an ice cream stand that serves Gifford’s and bags of corn kernels to feed the ducks in the pond out back. There are four churches. (Needless to say, there’s no synagogue.) Or traffic lights or chain stores. It’s a little slice of heaven. Continue reading


Leave a comment

Life-changing Butter

IMG_1757I’ve been craving a new cookbook for months. I’ve exhausted all the recipes on my shelf and I’m practically itching for a shiny new tome to start cooking my way through. But my cookbook shelf is full to capacity and my neurotic need to keep all my books in one place has so far trumped my craving to expand the collection. Plus, there are a few books of my dad’s that have been woefully neglected over the years. And so, I’m dusting them off and finding all the new-to-me recipes that I’ve been ignoring for too long. Continue reading


1 Comment

Happy Birthday, Blog!

imageToday is my blog’s first birthday (!!) and for some reason I can think of nothing more appropriate to share with you than a story of total kitchen failure. I spend a lot of time writing about all the good food that makes its way off my stove and into our bellies, but every once in a while (aka on a semi-regular basis), things go terribly wrong. And there is almost nothing that frustrates me more. Continue reading


Leave a comment

Green Thumb Dreams

IMG_1683Every morning on my walk to work I pass the gardener for The Farnsboro condominium building. He is meticulous; raking every last leaf out from between the hydrangeas, pruning each plant to perfection, arranging mulch like Tibetan monks creating sand mandalas. Everyday we exchange pleasantries, and everyday I secretly wish I could stop and play in the dirt and soak up his green thumb secrets. Despite the summers I spent on the farm, I am not nearly the horticulturist I should be. It’s not that I kill every plant I touch, I just haven’t kept every plant alive. Continue reading


Leave a comment

Pomp and Circumstance

imageCampus has been preparing for weeks. Every last bit of wrought iron got a fresh coat of shiny black paint – gates, railings, lamp posts, and barriers. The wilting tulips were pulled and replaced with rows of bright red petunias. Fresh sod was laid, windows washed, floors were waxed. And then the final touches – stages built, tents erected, and a sea of chairs spread across Healy Lawn. Golf carts buzzed everywhere, filled with stanchions and water, boxes of programs and signage.  It’s graduation time and it’s a beautiful thing. Continue reading